NEA Big Read

NEABigRead-Color-with partner names

Our NEA Big Read book for 2017 is
The Round House by Louise Erdrich
October 1-31, 2017

round-house-cover
A program of the National Endowment for the Arts, the NEA Big Read broadens our understanding of our world, our communities, and ourselves through the joy of sharing a good book. Managed by Arts Midwest, this initiative offers grants to support innovative community reading programs designed around a single book. 

NEA Big Read Calendar

October 1-31, 2017

Lewis & Clark Library

 


Kickoff Reception

Tuesday, October 3

6-7 PM

The entire community is invited to our kick-off event. Free Big Read and Little Read books, food and entertainment.

 

Keynote: Introduction to The Round House with Montana Indian Poetry 

Tuesday, October 3

7 PM

Humanities Montana speaker Dorothea Susag will introduce the community to The Round House by Louise Erdrich via Montana Indian poetry. Susag will discuss themes of men and their mothers with both The Round House and a poem by Jack Real Bird. Themes of betrayal and James Welch’s poetry will be explored together, as will other themes and corresponding poetry.


Informed Humans Club

Wednesday, October 4

4 PM

Learn more about what’s going on in our community, state, country, and the world! This informal group is designed for curious and inquisitive teens. Heather, Teen Services Librarian at Lewis & Clark Library, coordinates this group.


Can I Kiss You?

Wednesday, October 4

6:30 PM

The "Can I Kiss You" project is an initiative of the Date Safe Project. This two hour presentation for teens is meant to create an environment for open discussion and discoveries that lead to positive behavioral changes with regards to dating, consent, intimacy, and awareness to create a culture of consent and respect for all people.

 

 Teens Read @ East Helena Branch

Thursday, October 5

3:45 PM

Read and discuss the Little Read, The Birchbark House by Louise Erdrich.


Resilience: Stories of Montana’s Native American Women

Thursday, October 5

7 PM

Helena College Auditorium

Since 1492, the First Nations of North American have had to grapple with colonialism and the trauma left in its wake. In her recent novel, The Round House, Turtle Mountain Chippewa author Louise Erdrich addresses one of colonization’s most prevalent and persistent legacies: violence against Native women and its effects on their families and communities today. Using Erdich’s works as a springboard, Montana historian Laura Ferguson will present biographical stories of Native women from Montana who confronted the impacts of colonization on cultural survival, education, health care, politics, economic justice, and, ultimately, identity.

  

Big Read Films at the Helena Branch

Please call the Lewis & Clark Library for film titles & more information. 406-447-1690.

Saturday, October 7 at 12 PM

 Sunday, October 8 at 2 PM

Sunday, October 22 at 2 PM

 Sunday October 28 at 2 PM


Big Read Movie Night at the Lincoln Library

October 18 at 4:30 PM


Big Read Films at the Augusta Branch

Sunday, October 8 at 6 PM

Sunday, October 22 at 6 PM

Call 562-3348 for titles and more information.

 

Middle School Book Group discusses Trickster

Tuesday, October 10 at 4 PM

Young people in grades 6-8 are invited to join our Middle School Book Group! We'll read all sorts of good books: you get to choose! Plus board games, excellent snacks, and really cool people. Try it out and bring a friend! Lisa, the Public Services Manager at Lewis & Clark Library, leads this group.

 

Teens Read @ East Helena Branch

Thursday, October 12

3:45 PM

Read and discuss the Little Read, The Birchbark House by Louise Erdrich.

 

Storytelling: Cultural Survival, Indigenous Cultures, and the Importance of Story

Thursday, October 12 at 7 PM

Humanities Montana speaker, student advisor at University of Montana, public speaker and educator Joseph Grady will explore how storytelling is integral to education and cultural survival. How does story define community? How does it keep cultures intact? What functions does story serve in shaping our understanding of the world? How do we learn about the stories of our history? Joseph Grady will share some stories and draw on his background in social work and theater to lead a discussion about the power of theater, storytelling, and performance, with a focus on indigenous American stories and perspectives.


Finding and Capturing Your Story

Sunday, October 15

1 PM

Seating is limited. Please call 447-1690 to register.

StoryKeepers executive director and president of the Art Associates of Missoula Susie Risho will teach a writing workshop for all ages. Risho inspires and instructs people to find and keep their own, or their loved ones’ stories. She guides and ignites our memories to recall unique and common experiences, which can model how they or another person will come upon their own memories. There will be opportunities for sharing orally as well as various writing experiences, including developing skills in organizing, memory prompting, automatic writing, photo-journaling, and using historical fiction. Participants can gain knowledge and confidence to actually capture real life stories.

 

Lunch with the Filmmakers Andrew & Alex Smith

Tuesday, October 17

12:10 PM

Large Meeting Room at the Lewis & Clark Library

Bring your own lunch and meet the filmmakers Andrew & Alex Smith. The first 15 people through the door win tickets to their film "Walking Out" showing at the Myrna Loy Center that night. Alex & Andrew will discuss making the film "Winter in the Blood", based on the novel by James Welch as part of the Big Read, and talk about what it's like behind the camera with their latest, "Walking Out." Free and open to the public.

 

Cross Cultural Politics

Tuesday, October 17

7 PM

Director of Student Success at Salish Kootenai College and 2006-2010 chairman of the Tribal Council of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes James Steele Jr. will share his expertise on cross-cultural politics, governments, legislature and policy, and how the federal and state governments interact with tribal Councils. He is an expert on how federal and state law affects reservations and on how tribal councils and state governments navigate a shared landscape. Steele will lead a discussion on internal politics in government and the effects of government policy on reservations.

 

In Our Communities: Sexual Violence Resource Panel Discussion

Wednesday, October 18

7 PM

Learn about the challenges and local resources for sexual violence survivors. Donations to the Friendship Center are warmly accepted. Go to www.thefriendshipcenter.org for a list of most needed items.

American Girl Party: Meet Kaya

Friday, October 27

4 PM

Kids in grades 3-5 are invited to learn about lessons passed on through storytelling and the life of the Nez Perce tribe through the children’s book, Meet Kaya. 

 

Book Discussions

Join in a discussion of The Round House by Louise Erdrich at any of these times and locations.


Wednesday, October 11

6 PM

Small Meeting Room, Lewis & Clark Library


Monday, October 16

6 PM

Small Meeting Room, Lewis & Clark Library

 

Thursday, October 19

12:15 PM

The Sandbox, Corette Library, Carroll College campus


Friday, October 20

2 PM
East Helena Branch


Saturday, October 21

11 AM

Small Meeting Room, Lewis & Clark Library


Monday, October 23

12 PM

Holter Museum of Art


Tuesday, October 24

5:30 PM

Helena College


Thursday, October 26

4 PM
Lincoln Library


Thursday, October 26

6 PM

Small Meeting Room, Lewis & Clark Library


Saturday, October 28 

2 PM

Small Meeting Room, Lewis & Clark Library


Monday, October 30

12 PM

Montana Historical Society


Monday, October 30

5:30 PM

Augusta Branch Library


Exhibit

Louise Ogemahgeshig Fischer

September 1-October 31

Lewis & Clark Library

Louise Ogemahgeshig Fischer is a member of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe. Louise works with a variety of artistic media, and her passion for art is apparent in her oil and acrylic paintings, clay sculpture, and other traditional Indian art and crafts projects.

At the Lewis & Clark Library, Louise is showcasing her metal sculptures. Louise’s plasma cut metal sculptures are made from old scrap metal and wood that bring a history into her art. Louise cuts freehand, without patterns, and creates a sense of place, whether with birds, bison, or traditional Indian symbols.


NEA Big Read is a program of the National Endowment for the Arts in partnership with Arts Midwest.

NEA Big Read is a program of the National Endowment for the Arts in partnership with Arts Midwest.